Reviews

Film Reviews

The French Dispatch (2021), A Love-Letter to Journalism

One common recurrence you see on Twitter is people being shocked to learn that Wes Anderson was born and raised in Houston, Texas. This, no doubt, is because of the very European aesthetic that he conjures in his films, while this has certainly become more pronounced with his more recent films like The Grand BudapestContinue reading “The French Dispatch (2021), A Love-Letter to Journalism”

The Last Duel (2021) – A Question of Honor, Chivalry, Hairpieces and Justice

After four years of silence, the iconic and insanely prolific Sir Ridley Scott has finally returned in the year of our lord 2021 with not one but two films, both historical films based on real events featuring Adam Driver: The Last Duel and House of Gucci. Of course if anyone is at all familiar withContinue reading “The Last Duel (2021) – A Question of Honor, Chivalry, Hairpieces and Justice”

Dune (2021) – A World Beyond Our Experience, Beyond Our Imagination

When it was announced that Denis Villeneuve was going to direct a new adaptation of Frank Herbert’s classic and foundational science fiction opus Dune, I remember jumping in excitement, if not physically in spirit. I couldn’t dream of a better or more perfect match between filmmaker and source material. Even if I hadn’t read theContinue reading “Dune (2021) – A World Beyond Our Experience, Beyond Our Imagination”

Everybody’s Talking About Jamie (2021), a Return to British Tradition…With Music This Time!

Everybody’s Talking About Jamie, which is based on the broadway musical of the same name, which in turn is based on a documentary called Jamie: Drag Queen at 16, owes a debt to some of the best British films ever released; Kes, Billy Elliot & The Full Monty. It follows the same elements of workingContinue reading “Everybody’s Talking About Jamie (2021), a Return to British Tradition…With Music This Time!”

The Suicide Squad (2021), a Unique, Cartoonish, & Fun Comic Book Movie Unlike Any We’ve Seen Before.

Back in 2016, David Ayer’s Suicide Squad was one of my most anticipated films of the year, I remember going to see it with a group of friends in the cinema and hyping up how great it was going to be, until it started. Now I do feel somewhat sorry for David Ayer with theContinue reading “The Suicide Squad (2021), a Unique, Cartoonish, & Fun Comic Book Movie Unlike Any We’ve Seen Before.”

Illang: The Wolf Brigade (2018) – A Frustratingly Confusing Backfire from Kim Jee-woon

There are certain movies known for having notoriously complicated plots and stories that especially on first viewing are sometimes mind-numbing and are often subject to criticism from critics when they appear. I’m thinking of films like The Big Lebowski, Miami Vice and hell even the first Mission: Impossible. What these films have in common, atContinue reading “Illang: The Wolf Brigade (2018) – A Frustratingly Confusing Backfire from Kim Jee-woon”

Spiral: From the Book of Saw (2021), a Fun Return to the Franchise

Spiral opens with a shot of fireworks bursting colour across the dark black sky. The explosions represent a celebration, not just narratively, as it’s the 4th of July weekend, but thematically. 2017’s Jigsaw was widely panned by critics and fans alike, one major bone of contention being the move away from the franchise’s focus onContinue reading “Spiral: From the Book of Saw (2021), a Fun Return to the Franchise”

The Woman in the Window (2021) – The Poor Man’s Fincher doing the Poor Man’s Hitchcock

Joe Wright is supposed to be a fine director if one goes according to some of my mutuals on Film Twitter. His films Pride and Prejudice and Atonement are frequently discussed on the tl, be it in regards to their painterly cinematography, their performances or just making people horny for hot people or whatever. AlthoughContinue reading “The Woman in the Window (2021) – The Poor Man’s Fincher doing the Poor Man’s Hitchcock”

Outside the Wire (2021), a Forgettable War Film Loosely Passing as Sci-Fi

The start of the year brought much uncertainty for the film industry, with the global pandemic still raging and the announcements of long-awaited films like No Time to Die and Edgar Wright’s Last Night in Soho having been delayed once again, the cinematic landscape looked like it was gearing up for another year of streamingContinue reading “Outside the Wire (2021), a Forgettable War Film Loosely Passing as Sci-Fi”

Saint Maud (2020), Isolation, Religion and Sexuality at the Sea-Side

Name a better combination than Britain and Horror….that’s right you can’t. Now I’m willing to admit that this statement carries a fair amount of bias, being a British Horror fan myself, but while many tote Japan, Italy, or America as the paragons of the genre, there’s an undeniable charm and legacy that Britain has whenContinue reading “Saint Maud (2020), Isolation, Religion and Sexuality at the Sea-Side”

I’m Thinking of Ending Things (2020), Charlie, I Love You, But You’re Bringing Me Down

Charlie Kaufman has made two movies and released them in a contained, movie length package, and it’s extremely hard to talk about.  Kaufman is one of those filmmakers who makes movies so hermetically sealed and deeply personal that they are functionally review proof. They are here, and they exist, and talking about them fundamentally comesContinue reading “I’m Thinking of Ending Things (2020), Charlie, I Love You, But You’re Bringing Me Down”

License to Review – Special Edition: Never Say Never Again (1983)

James Bond will return to cinemas this November with his twenty-fifth adventure, No Time to Die. In preparation, David Alkhed will take a look at all the previous entries in the franchise and see which ones are deserving of praise (shaken) and which ones aren’t (stirred). After Diamonds Are Forever, Sean Connery reportedly said “neverContinue reading “License to Review – Special Edition: Never Say Never Again (1983)”

An American Pickle (2020): Capitalist Propaganda Masked By Buddy Comedy

There seems to be something happening in American Comedy ™ at the moment. A big problem I’ve been having with American Comedy ™ of late is that it feels like there wasn’t any actual filmmaking happening, it’s just one big homogeneous glob of improvisation. No real jokes just people all standing in a room withContinue reading “An American Pickle (2020): Capitalist Propaganda Masked By Buddy Comedy”

License to Review #12: For Your Eyes Only (1981)

James Bond will return to cinemas this November with his twenty-fifth adventure, No Time to Die. In preparation, David Alkhed will take a look at all the previous entries in the franchise and see which ones are deserving of praise (shaken) and which ones aren’t (stirred). “It filled me with wonder, because of its cinematographicContinue reading “License to Review #12: For Your Eyes Only (1981)”

Staff Picks: The Sensational Stanley Kubrick

Today marks the birth of one of the looming legends of the modern motion picture, American director Stanley Kubrick. To commemorate this occasion, we at A Fistful of Film have chosen to examine a fair portion of his filmography, from his early studio pictures to his acclaimed latter-day output.

License to Review #9: The Man with the Golden Gun (1974)

James Bond will return to cinemas this November with his twenty-fifth adventure, No Time to Die. In preparation, David Alkhed will take a look at all the previous entries in the franchise and see which ones are deserving of praise (shaken) and which ones aren’t (stirred). There is a tendency amongst the James Bond filmsContinue reading “License to Review #9: The Man with the Golden Gun (1974)”

License to Review #6: On Her Majesty’s Secret Service (1969)

James Bond will return to cinemas this November with his twenty-fifth adventure, No Time to Die. In preparation, David Alkhed will take a look at all the previous entries in the franchise and see which ones are deserving of praise (shaken) and which ones aren’t (stirred). Sean Connery had quit the James Bond franchise followingContinue reading “License to Review #6: On Her Majesty’s Secret Service (1969)”

The Good, the Bad, the Weird (2008) – A Fistful of Holy Shit

I’ve reviewed two South Korean films for this website, Memories of Murder and House of Hummingbird. One of them is a darkly comical detective mystery and the other one is a coming-of-age drama. In the review for the latter I mentioned my desire to watch additional Korean films that weren’t genre-films and I hope toContinue reading “The Good, the Bad, the Weird (2008) – A Fistful of Holy Shit”

Jesus Shows You the Way to the Highway, (2020) – The Craziest Film of the Year, and Maybe the Best

There’s a sentiment I often hear at the moment, that there’s a certain era of filmmaking that’s past. Where you could just stumble across a masterpiece and when genuinely strange and brilliant films could get released. People basically jacking off the nostalgia of the 60s and 70s tell me this. I’m looking at you Quentin,Continue reading “Jesus Shows You the Way to the Highway, (2020) – The Craziest Film of the Year, and Maybe the Best”

A Certain Sacrifice (1985): Madonna’s surreal and ‘borderline’ insane debut

By random chance, I got curious about Madonna’s filmography besides Dick Tracy, Evita and Swept Away. So I went to check her filmography on Wikipedia and started to skim through it. Then I noticed this little oddity, placed right before Desperately Seeking Susan, which should make this Madonna’s big-screen debut. I enter it’s Wikipedia page,Continue reading “A Certain Sacrifice (1985): Madonna’s surreal and ‘borderline’ insane debut”

The New York Ripper (1982): All Vice, No Virtue

“The New York Ripper” takes two of my favorite niche styles of crime cinema and fuses them into one superb display of vice and violence. On one hand, you have a superbly stylized 80s giallo. On the other hand, it has the attitude & grime of a 70s urban crime flick.

High and Low (1963): Crime and Punishment between Heaven and Hell

Whenever the cinematic legacy of Akira Kurosawa gets brought up, there is a tendency amongst cinephiles to focus squarely on the numerous samurai films he made with Toshiro Mifune. You know the ones I’m talking about, Seven Samurai, Yojimbo, Throne of Blood, The Hidden Fortress etc. Whilst it’s most certainly true that Kurosawa made manyContinue reading “High and Low (1963): Crime and Punishment between Heaven and Hell”

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