Show Me Cinema #10: Let the Right One In

There is a definitive, albeit not too surprising, shortage of really good Swedish horror films. In fact the only ones I can think of that have received some kind of recognition, both abroad and domestically, are Viktor Sjöström’s The Phantom Carriage (Körkarlen) and Ingmar Bergman’s Hour of the Wolf (Vargtimmen). Other than that, the majorityContinue reading “Show Me Cinema #10: Let the Right One In”

The Good, the Bad, the Weird (2008) – A Fistful of Holy Shit

I’ve reviewed two South Korean films for this website, Memories of Murder and House of Hummingbird. One of them is a darkly comical detective mystery and the other one is a coming-of-age drama. In the review for the latter I mentioned my desire to watch additional Korean films that weren’t genre-films and I hope toContinue reading “The Good, the Bad, the Weird (2008) – A Fistful of Holy Shit”

License to Review #3: Goldfinger (1964)

James Bond will return to cinemas this November with his twenty-fifth adventure, No Time to Die. In preparation, David Alkhed will take a look at all the previous entries in the franchise and see which ones are deserving of praise (shaken) and which ones aren’t (stirred). When watching the early James Bond films featuring SeanContinue reading “License to Review #3: Goldfinger (1964)”

License to Review #2: From Russia with Love (1963)

James Bond will return to cinemas this November with his twenty-fifth adventure, No Time to Die. In preparation, David Alkhed will take a look at all the previous entries in the franchise and see which ones are deserving of praise and which ones aren’t. Following the smash success of Dr. No, a sequel was quicklyContinue reading “License to Review #2: From Russia with Love (1963)”

A Certain Sacrifice (1985): Madonna’s surreal and ‘borderline’ insane debut

By random chance, I got curious about Madonna’s filmography besides Dick Tracy, Evita and Swept Away. So I went to check her filmography on Wikipedia and started to skim through it. Then I noticed this little oddity, placed right before Desperately Seeking Susan, which should make this Madonna’s big-screen debut. I enter it’s Wikipedia page,Continue reading “A Certain Sacrifice (1985): Madonna’s surreal and ‘borderline’ insane debut”

License to Review #1: Dr. No (1962)

James Bond will return to cinemas this November with his twenty-fifth adventure, No Time to Die. In preparation, David Alkhed will take a look at all the previous entries in the franchise and see which ones are deserving of praise and which ones aren’t. Few film franchises have been as impactful and long-lasting as theContinue reading “License to Review #1: Dr. No (1962)”

High and Low (1963): Crime and Punishment between Heaven and Hell

Whenever the cinematic legacy of Akira Kurosawa gets brought up, there is a tendency amongst cinephiles to focus squarely on the numerous samurai films he made with Toshiro Mifune. You know the ones I’m talking about, Seven Samurai, Yojimbo, Throne of Blood, The Hidden Fortress etc. Whilst it’s most certainly true that Kurosawa made manyContinue reading “High and Low (1963): Crime and Punishment between Heaven and Hell”

Show Me Cinema #8: Loving Couples

The 1960s were a time of change, not just politically and socially but also cinematically. Younger filmmakers had grown tired of the big and extravagant films that were produced in Hollywood. This was true not just for American filmmakers, but everywhere else around the world as well. Filmmakers in France, Japan, Britain, Italy and SpainContinue reading “Show Me Cinema #8: Loving Couples”

House of Hummingbird (2018): Confident, cohesive and coming-of-age at it’s best

For some strange reason, coming-of-age films tend to be some of the most universal films around and some of the easiest to sell internationally. Or maybe it isn’t that strange really now that I think of it, since coming-of-age can be something very unique and personal yet also universal at the same time. We allContinue reading “House of Hummingbird (2018): Confident, cohesive and coming-of-age at it’s best”