High and Low (1963): Crime and Punishment between Heaven and Hell

Whenever the cinematic legacy of Akira Kurosawa gets brought up, there is a tendency amongst cinephiles to focus squarely on the numerous samurai films he made with Toshiro Mifune. You know the ones I’m talking about, Seven Samurai, Yojimbo, Throne of Blood, The Hidden Fortress etc. Whilst it’s most certainly true that Kurosawa made manyContinue reading “High and Low (1963): Crime and Punishment between Heaven and Hell”

Show Me Cinema #8: Loving Couples

The 1960s were a time of change, not just politically and socially but also cinematically. Younger filmmakers had grown tired of the big and extravagant films that were produced in Hollywood. This was true not just for American filmmakers, but everywhere else around the world as well. Filmmakers in France, Japan, Britain, Italy and SpainContinue reading “Show Me Cinema #8: Loving Couples”

House of Hummingbird (2018): Confident, cohesive and coming-of-age at it’s best

For some strange reason, coming-of-age films tend to be some of the most universal films around and some of the easiest to sell internationally. Or maybe it isn’t that strange really now that I think of it, since coming-of-age can be something very unique and personal yet also universal at the same time. We allContinue reading “House of Hummingbird (2018): Confident, cohesive and coming-of-age at it’s best”

ANDREI RUBLEV (1966) – TARKOVSKY’S EPIC ODE TO ART AND THE ARTIST

“An artist never works under ideal conditions. If they existed, his work wouldn’t exist, for the artist doesn’t live in a vacuum. Some sort of pressure must exist. The artist exists because the world is not perfect. Art would be useless if the world were perfect, as man wouldn’t look for harmony but would simplyContinue reading “ANDREI RUBLEV (1966) – TARKOVSKY’S EPIC ODE TO ART AND THE ARTIST”

YEAR OF THE DRAGON (1985) – CIMINO’S SPRAWLING, UNEVEN, ILL-DISCIPLINED YET COMPELLING AND ENJOYABLE COP THRILLER

“Dragons are strong and independent figures, but they yearn for support and love.”   That quote could apply to both Stanley White, the main character of Year of the Dragon played by Mickey Rourke, and its director Michael Cimino. I have a morbid fascination with Cimino. Perhaps the reason lies in the fact that soContinue reading “YEAR OF THE DRAGON (1985) – CIMINO’S SPRAWLING, UNEVEN, ILL-DISCIPLINED YET COMPELLING AND ENJOYABLE COP THRILLER”

Show Me Cinema #5: Show Me Love

I mentioned in my review of Bo Widerberg’s The Man on the Roof how Sweden has a virtual overabundance of detective-related fiction, stretching from cinema to literature and television. You know what? Scratch that, we have an overabundance of detective fiction. Likewise you could say the same in regards to coming-of-age or teen fiction. It’sContinue reading “Show Me Cinema #5: Show Me Love”

SHOW ME CINEMA #4: THE VIRGIN SPRING

TW: Discussions of rape and violence.   It was not my intention to review yet another Ingmar Bergman film directly after covering Smiles of a Summer Night in my previous column. I wanted to move into new territory, new director, new actors etc. But I was sucked back into Bergman for a very sad reasonContinue reading “SHOW ME CINEMA #4: THE VIRGIN SPRING”

George Miller: The Mad Max Films

Despite not exactly being a household name outside of most film circles and cinephiles and a relatively small body of work, the Australian film director George Miller has proven to be one of the most influential directors, not just in film but in culture in general. Let’s face it, the only reason post-apocalyptic costumes andContinue reading “George Miller: The Mad Max Films”